Dschaak- What nationality is that? German. Really? Where does it come from?

With a name as unusual as Dschaak that is a frequent exchange when meeting new people. With that I decided this would be a good blog entry.

Where does it come from?

We know our most immediate ancestors are of German decent who immigrated to the U.S. from the Odessa area of the Ukraine in the 1800’s. There are many different spellings in the official records: Jauk, Jaak, Schaak, Dzaak, Dzauk, Dzauck, and Dschaak. Apparently, the official records most often were wedding and birth records which were recorded by the local priest. They often entered the name phonetically, which is why you find so many different spellings of such an unusual name. Dschaak is unique even in the Germanic areas.

Why so unusual?

Based on a letter from Joseph Height (circa 1970) the French name Jacques was germanized into Dschaak (and various other spellings) during the days of the French Huguenots. The Huguenots were contemporary with the Lutherans in Germany. In the mid 1500’s they became a large and influential political group. They were persecuted by the Catholic government. In 1572 the government began the Massacre of St. Batholomew’s Day in which thousands of Huguenots were killed. Many of the Huegenots left France for Holland, America, England, and Prussia. We can track the Dschaak family back to Prussia in the 1600’s, which lends to the theory that they were originally French Huguenots.

Written by: Martin Dschaak

Source: A Brief History of the Dschaak Family by Jennice Dschaak Abercrombie Curlee.

 

I have decided to put an official blog on the website.  I think this might be more conducive to people viewing and keeping up the us Dschaak’s here in Loveland.  The Dschaak Family Forums never seem to have caught on, so this is my attempt to keep my family and friends near and far abreast of what is happening with us.  Feel free to click the “subscribe” button on the right to keep up to date in real time.

© 2011 Dschaak Family - Loveland Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha